Patient

woman sleeping
By Christopher Shade, PhD

Sleep deprivation has reached epidemic status in the United States, with a shocking one-third of adults getting less than the recommended 7-8 hours of sleep per night and 4 percent routinely using prescription sleep aids to induce slumber.1-3 Insufficient sleep exponentially increases your patients’ risk of long-term health complications. Natural sleep therapies are a time-tested strategy for easing your patients into deep, restorative slumber without the harmful effects of prescription sleep aids.

The Science of Sleep

Sleep, long considered an...

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walnuts
By Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO

According to A.J. Schenkman:

“… if Washington did cut down a cherry tree it was most likely to make room for planting a walnut tree, and if he did have wooden teeth his real teeth likely were ruined breaking walnuts. One thing is true, confirmed by sources both foreign and domestic: General Washington, whether at home in Mount Vernon or at his headquarters in Newburgh, always had plenty of walnuts on hand."

Washington's personal papers are littered with references regarding purchases of [nuts] he was, in fact, fond of nuts of all kind. Walnuts, however, were his favorite. He...

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By Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO

With all the articles about measles and measles vaccine in the news these past few weeks, I am reminded about a topic I wrote about in 2013, the Non-Specific Effects of Vaccination. This term describes an interesting phenomenon - vaccines provide protection against a range of infections besides the infection caused by the organism from which the vaccine is made and which it is intended to prevent.

Looking specifically at the measles vaccine, in 2013 I wrote:

A 2013 African study reported that the measles vaccine cut deaths from all other infections combined by a third, mainly...

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Ketogenic Foods
By Maxwell Crispo, ND

The ketogenic diet is gaining increasing attention and popularity in the mainstream. The name and concept, unknown to most only a few years ago, is now well-recognized in many North American households. Medical literature, however, dates back as far as the Hippocratic era investigating the therapeutic efficacy of dietary interventions that induce ketosis.1 While varying degrees of clinical evidence supports this nutritional modification in conditions such as epilepsy,Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s,3 brain tumours,4 and obesity,5 the...

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Brain Image
By Russell M. Jaffe, MD, PhD

A sustainable brain responds to life with resilience and learned optimism. From mood stability to mobility, from senses to sensibility there is much we can do to add years to life and life to years. This is a brief user’s guide and contemporary update about how to have a healthy brain for life and how to improve or recover function when needed. First, we review the functions of your brains and then our synthesis of keeping your brain tuned up for life.

Brains: CNS and GNS

Brains, both Central and Intestinal, are responsible for how well we comprehend, concentrate, feel,...

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By Laura Pole, RN, MSN
February 18, 2019

From five kinds of evidence that men with cancer use in guiding decisions about complementary approaches to care, researchers found that patients put the most stock in personal stories and the least priority on rigorous scientific evidence.1 Health professionals tend to reverse this hierarchy of evidence.

Finding common ground can be challenging.

The Landscape

We have found that sites mentioning integrative cancer therapies typically fall in four broad categories:

  • Sites from large medical centers, academia and government
  • Commercial...
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Dry Eyes
By Elise Brisco, OD, FAAO, FCOVD, CCH

How do your eyes feel at the end of the day? If you are like the majority who are literally staring at a computer or cell phone for much of the day, or part of the growing aging population, you’d probably answer, “My eyes are often tired and dry.”

Chronic dry eyes affect as high as 87.5% (Fenga et al) of computer users and 73.5% (Uchini et al) of the elderly population. It is the number one vision problem that optometrists and ophthalmologists treat. Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) is becoming an epidemic because our work, play and socialization has shifted from working with our bodies, to...

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Collagen blog post
By Russell M. Jaffe, MD, PhD

Collagen’s story

Collagen has been a personal passion of mine since graduate school where my thesis tells the story of how collagen and elastin cross-links are affected by d-penicillamine, a remarkable amino acid.

Collagen has been around since metazoan times. Its structure is elegantly simple and simply elegant. Glycine-proline-Any amino acid is a base unit that, when repeated about 1,000 times, becomes one strand of collagen. Three strands wind together to make a single collagen molecule.

Collagen is a major part of the infrastructure of all mammals, fish, birds,...

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Man Running
By Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
October 31, 2018

A new paper from researchers at Harvard University confirms earlier evidence that exercise is protective against prostate cancer mortality.

In this new study published in the October 2018 issue of European Urology, men who engaged most frequently in vigorous activities had a 30% lower risk of advanced prostate cancer, a 25% lower risk of developing advanced prostate cancer, and a 25% lower risk of dying from prostate cancer, compared to men who exercised the least. Data was gathered from 49,160 men aged 40-75 enrolled in the Professionals Follow-up Study who were tracked from 1986...

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Natural Medicine Week
By Sarah Bedell Cook, ND
October 18, 2018

When I ran a private naturopathic practice, my stomach churned more at the thought of promoting myself than at eating a Big Mac chased by a box of Twinkies and a 40-ounce Coke.* I dreaded networking events and public talks, terrified that I might appear pushy or salesy. The result? I was the town’s best-kept secret.

As I followed a winding career path into medical writing and content marketing, I learned what I never understood in those early years of private practice. The first step to serving the people who need you most is letting them know that you exist. There are hundreds—even...

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