Peer-Reviewed Articles

Editor In Chief
Conventional therapies have limited success in preventing or reversing symptoms of neuropathic pain and numbness. In the past decade there has been a surge in publications suggesting acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) may be an effective neuroprotectant and antinociceptive for peripheral neuropathy. This review highlights the uses, doses, and proposed mechanisms of action for the therapeutic effects of ALC in patients with peripheral neuropathy.
ND, FABNO
It is certainly possible, as these papers suggest, to significantly lower the formation of carcinogens during cooking, even while barbecuing. Incorporating specific ingredients into meat through mixing, marinades, or rubs provides accessible means to inhibit formation of HCAs.
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is required for the synthesis of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine and for myelin formation. This monograph summarizes the research on the vitamin, including information on its most and least effective uses.
Vitamin D is one of the most publicized nutrients today. This monograph assesses the recent research, outlines the most and least promising uses for the vitamin, and explains interactions and contraindications.
ND, FABNO
Cherries, the fruit of Prunus cerasus trees, and their juice concentrates may be clinically beneficial in various conditions, including gout, arthritis, muscle injury, diabetes and neurodegeneration. In general tart cherries contain more beneficial phytochemicals.
Zinc is necessary for the functioning of more than 300 different enzymes and plays a vital role in a large number of biological processes. This article distills the copious research surrounding the mineral and rates its effectiveness for a variety of conditions.
ND
Hawthorn and hibiscus have a long history of use in traditional botanical medicine in many parts of the world for their multiple health effects, but especially in relation to cardiovascular disorders. In the last 15-20 years, modern research has expanded and clarified those uses. Hawthorn research has focused on congestive heart failure, and sour tea research has focused on hypertension and dyslipidemia, with several clinical trials emerging in the last 3-4 years.
Editor In Chief
dl-alpha tocopheryl succinate (aTOS) is an analogue of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) with unique biological properties. Unlike its parent compound, aTOS does not have a redox potential and is therefore not an antioxidant. Its ability to prolong cell cycle arrest, induce apoptosis, and act as a radiosensitizer make aTOS a compound of great interest in integrative cancer care. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests it is capable of simultaneously protecting normal cells from chromosomal damage while potentiating cytotoxicity of conventional therapies.
The practice of acupuncture originated in China 5,000 years ago. Today it is widely used throughout the world and is one of the main pillars of Chinese medicine. There are many different varieties of the practice of acupuncture, both in the Orient and in the West. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) usually combines acupuncture with Chinese herbs. Classical acupuncture (also known as five element acupuncture) uses a different needling technique and relies on acupuncture independent of the use of herbs. Japanese acupuncture uses smaller needles than the other varieties. Medical acupuncture refers to acupuncture practiced by a conventional medical doctor. Auricular acupuncture treats the entire body through acupuncture points in the ears only. Electroacupuncture uses electrical currents attached to acupuncture needles.
Glucosamine is a natural compound that is found in healthy cartilage. Glucosamine sulfate is a normal constituent of glycoaminoglycans in cartilage matrix and synovial fluid. Available evidence from randomized controlled trials supports the use of glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of osteoarthritis, particularly of the knee. It is believed that the sulfate moiety provides clinical benefit in the synovial fluid by strengthening cartilage and aiding glycosaminoglycan synthesis. If this hypothesis is confirmed, it would mean that only the glucosamine sulfate form is effective and non-sulfated glucosamine forms are not effective.