Peer Reviewed Articles

The Role of Methionine in Cancer Growth and Control

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
12-02-2015 
Restriction of methionine in the diet has been used in animal studies as a mimetic to caloric restriction with similar metabolic effects. Many of these effects, such as lower insulin-like growth factor, should induce favorable outcomes in patients with a history of cancer. This review explores the theory and evidence for a normal-calorie, methionine-restriction diet in the context of cancer care specifically.

Effects of Oral Supplementation With Methylsulfonylmethane on Skin Health and Wrinkle Reduction

by Michael Anthonavage
11-04-2015 
The effects and perception of aging are directly reflected in the health and condition of the skin. Beauty and antiaging products largely focus on treatment of the skin with an outside-in strategy. There is demand for “beauty from within” products that support underlying internal processes necessary for healthy and vital skin. This study assesses the effectiveness of methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) as an oral supplement on skin health using expert grading, instrumental measurements, and participant self-evaluation.

Identifying and Treating Magnesium Deficiency in Cancer Patients Receiving Platinum-based Chemotherapy

by Jen Green, ND, FABNO
10-07-2015 
In this article, the authors review the prevalence of magnesium (Mg) deficiency in patients undergoing platinum-based chemotherapy, summarize research on IV and oral Mg in supportive care, discuss the role of Mg in carcinogenesis, explore different forms of oral Mg, investigate current best evidence on the effect of Mg on survivorship, and review ways for clinicians to identify and remedy early signs of Mg depletion.

Air Pollution, Disease, and Mortality

by Walter Crinnion, ND
09-16-2015 
The World Health Organization has stated that air pollution accounts for 1.3 million deaths worldwide every year. This article reviews the association of air pollutants with all major causes of death. Those associations understood, it becomes clear that outdoor air pollution is likely to be an even greater cause of mortality across the globe than is currently recognized.

The Impact of Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain L-92 on Allergic Disease

by Ginny Bank, MS
09-02-2015 
Research has shown that prophylactic treatment, specifically with the probiotic Lactobacillus species, is a viable natural alternative in the treatment and possible prevention of allergic diseases. Lactobacillus acidophilus strain L-92 (L-92), a bacterial strain used widely in dietary supplements, cultured milk, and yogurt in Japan, has been shown to have potent antiallergic activity both in vitro and in vivo. This review summarizes and explores previous published research on L-92, including its proposed mechanisms of action based on animal and laboratory studies and evidence from clinical trials supporting its use in treatment of allergic diseases.

Clinical Applications of Fecal Transplant

by Mark Davis, ND
08-05-2015 
By Mark Davis, ND. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), most commonly known as fecal transplant, is the process of applying microbes from the stool of a healthy person to the GI tract of a sick person in order to restore the patient’s microbial community, and thus the patient, to good health. The US Food and Drug Administration presently regulates FMT as a drug and a biological agent to treat patients with Clostridium difficile infection not responding to standard therapies. In addition to clinician use of FMT, sick people all over the world are preparing FMT retention enemas themselves at home. This article examines the evidence for the safety and efficacy of FMT for various conditions.

Iodine Supplementation During Pregnancy and Lactation

by Douglas MacKay, ND
07-01-2015 
Iodine is a dietary mineral required for the production of thyroid hormones, which are necessary for brain development in utero and during early childhood. Iodine deficiency is associated with thyroid dysfunction, and frank iodine deficiency during pregnancy can result in irreversible brain damage and other neurological abnormalities in infants. Scientific evidence pertaining to the consequences of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency is less consistent, but emerging signals suggest that even moderate iodine deficiency during pregnancy and/or lactation is clinically meaningful. Clinicians who advise pregnant and lactating women play a key role in facilitating public health efforts to eliminate iodine deficiency in North America.

Curcumin Reduces Degenerative Disc Disease Pain

by Marcus Webb, ND, DO
06-03-2015 
Curcumin, extracted from turmeric, is a popular remedy for combating many inflammatory musculoskeletal-based and nonmusculoskeletal-based health concerns. While attention has been given to the effects of curcumin in relation to the pain and disability associated with arthritis of the peripheral joints, little has been written about its potential to help spinal pain, especially that of degenerative intervertebral disc disease. This brief review redresses this gap in information and offers some support and rationale for the use of curcumin preparations in this common and disabling disease.

Successful Eradication of Helicobacter pylori With Over-the-counter Products

by Mark Liponis, MD
05-06-2015 
Helicobacter pylori overgrowth in the gastrointestinal tract is a contributor to the formation of gastric ulcers, gastric cancer, and a unique lymphoma involving the gut mucosa (mucosal-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma). Extragastric conditions, such as rashes, joint pain, and autoimmune thrombocytopenia have also been linked to H pylori overgrowth. Current treatments to eradicate H pylori include antibiotics, which bring some risk of untoward effects. Natural agents such as bismuth, mastic gum, and oil of oregano may achieve the therapeutic goal of eradication without undue risks.

N-Acetylglucosamine for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

by Andy Z. X. Zhu, PhD
04-01-2015 
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with a widespread breakdown of glycosaminoglycans, which are normally attached to mucin and help to form a protective barrier separating bacteria from the intestinal epithelium. N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) is a naturally occurring amino sugar precursor for epithelial glycosaminoglycan synthesis. This pragmatic open-label clinical trial assessed the efficacy and safety of NAG and demonstrated that NAG could be an efficacious adjunctive treatment for IBD.

Atopic Dermatitis in Pediatric Patients

by Kristina Roberts, ND
03-04-2015 
Atopic dermatitis (AD) continues to increase in prevalence. In 30% to 40% of patients, this condition persists into adulthood. These statistics reflect poorly on the standard-of-care therapies that fail to address the root cause of AD and therefore cannot cure it. This overview describes treatment considerations that address the underlying cause, which is imperative to treatment success and patient satisfaction.

Plant Tannins

by Catherine Clinton, ND
03-02-2015 

The Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea Cohort, 2 Years Later

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
02-25-2015 
The Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) study was the largest prospective randomized controlled experiment examining the effects of a Mediterranean style diet ever conducted. It may be the most valuable clinical trial on diet ever performed. It is important for us to understand the knowledge gained from both the original report and the subsequent publications derived from study cohorts.

Metabolic Considerations in Autism Spectrum Disorder

by Elizabeth Mumper, MD
02-04-2015 
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a disorder characterized by social, communication, and behavioral impairments, has increased dramatically in recent years. The conventional medical paradigm defines ASD as a neurological disorder. Conventional treatments rely on behavioral therapies and psychotropic medications but have limited success and tolerability. A new paradigm is emerging that views ASD as a multisystem disorder accompanied by metabolic and mitochondrial impairments. A clinical approach to assess and treat metabolic dysfunction in ASD is reviewed here.

Inositol and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

by Megan Chmelik, ND
12-03-2014 
This review highlights inositol, specifically in the forms of myo-inositol and d-chiro inositol, in order to provide up-to-date information that can be applied to a clinical setting for the naturopathic treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Natural Interventions for Posttreatment Cancer-related Fatigue

by Lise Alschuler, ND, FABNO
11-05-2014 
Studies have consistently demonstrated that cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common debilitating side effects of radiation and chemotherapy, as well as the malignant process itself. Quality of life can be significantly and negatively impacted in cancer survivors who experience fatigue and other common symptoms, including sleep disturbance, pain, depression, and anxiety. Presently, pharmacological options are limited and are often associated with further side effects. An integrative approach that, in addition to optimizing lifestyle, employs specific natural agents can safely and effectively enhance energy levels after conventional cancer treatments.

Natural Antimicrobial Compounds in Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome

by John Deaton, PhD
10-01-2014 
The purpose of this trial was to determine if a combination of naturally occurring antimicrobials can allow reduction and suppression of the invading microorganisms under physiological conditions, so when the combination is given to a patient before eating, the nutrients will be broken down and used by the body, the body will have time to heal, and the probiotics will establish control over the pathogenic bacteria.

Galectin-3 as an Oncological Biomarker

by Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
09-03-2014 
This review summarizes the pathophysiological connection of galectin-3 and cancer presently in the literature, as well as the potential clinical value of galectin-3 as a prognostic oncology biomarker. Based on the preliminary data, the galectin-3 assay could become a contributing tool to help clinicians monitor treatment response and tumor progression, but further clinical studies evaluating galectin-3 levels and cancer progression are warranted.

Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

by Sarah Bedell Cook, ND
08-28-2014 
Osteoporosis is estimated to affect more than 10 million Americans, with postmenopausal women at particular risk. Osteoporotic fractures can lead to postural changes, emotional distress, and chronic pain. Currently all medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of osteoporosis carry slight to modest risks depending on the individual, the duration, the dosage, and the drug being used. Estrogen replacement therapy is not currently indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis, but it is approved for osteoporosis prevention. Interest in bioidentical hormone replacement as an alternative to conventional hormone replacement has increased in the last 12 years, although not always for logical or scientific reasons. The purpose of this review is to bring clinicians up to date on current information on the efficacy and safety of bioidentical hormones for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

by Todd A. Born, ND
08-06-2014 
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is subdivided into nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In the United States, prevalence of NAFLD is 10% to 46% of the population. Worldwide prevalence is 6% to 35% (median 20%). There is a need to increase understanding of liver disease and its many causes, which will help to improve patient outcomes and reduce the stigma many patients experience. This article discusses epidemiology, etiologies, suspected pathogenesis, and risk factors, along with conventional and naturopathic therapeutic treatment options.