Peer Reviewed Articles

Hibiscus, Hawthorn, and the Heart

by Tori Hudson, ND
07-01-2011 
Hawthorn and hibiscus have a long history of use in traditional botanical medicine in many parts of the world for their multiple health effects, but especially in relation to cardiovascular disorders. In the last 15-20 years, modern research has expanded and clarified those uses. Hawthorn research has focused on congestive heart failure, and sour tea research has focused on hypertension and dyslipidemia, with several clinical trials emerging in the last 3-4 years.

Zinc: Bottom Line Monograph

by Natural Standard
07-01-2011 
Zinc is necessary for the functioning of more than 300 different enzymes and plays a vital role in a large number of biological processes. This article distills the copious research surrounding the mineral and rates its effectiveness for a variety of conditions.

Acupuncture: Bottom-line Monograph

by Natural Standard
06-01-2011 
The practice of acupuncture originated in China 5,000 years ago. Today it is widely used throughout the world and is one of the main pillars of Chinese medicine. There are many different varieties of the practice of acupuncture, both in the Orient and in the West. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) usually combines acupuncture with Chinese herbs. Classical acupuncture (also known as five element acupuncture) uses a different needling technique and relies on acupuncture independent of the use of herbs. Japanese acupuncture uses smaller needles than the other varieties. Medical acupuncture refers to acupuncture practiced by a conventional medical doctor. Auricular acupuncture treats the entire body through acupuncture points in the ears only. Electroacupuncture uses electrical currents attached to acupuncture needles.

Alpha Tocopheryl Succinate in Cancer Care

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
06-01-2011 
dl-alpha tocopheryl succinate (aTOS) is an analogue of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) with unique biological properties. Unlike its parent compound, aTOS does not have a redox potential and is therefore not an antioxidant. Its ability to prolong cell cycle arrest, induce apoptosis, and act as a radiosensitizer make aTOS a compound of great interest in integrative cancer care. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests it is capable of simultaneously protecting normal cells from chromosomal damage while potentiating cytotoxicity of conventional therapies.

Glucosamine: Bottom Line Monograph

by Natural Standard
05-01-2011 
Glucosamine is a natural compound that is found in healthy cartilage. Glucosamine sulfate is a normal constituent of glycoaminoglycans in cartilage matrix and synovial fluid. Available evidence from randomized controlled trials supports the use of glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of osteoarthritis, particularly of the knee. It is believed that the sulfate moiety provides clinical benefit in the synovial fluid by strengthening cartilage and aiding glycosaminoglycan synthesis. If this hypothesis is confirmed, it would mean that only the glucosamine sulfate form is effective and non-sulfated glucosamine forms are not effective.

Probiotics for the Prevention of Childhood Eczema

by Barry W. Ritz, PhD
05-01-2011 
The prevalence of eczema has increased during the past few decades and continues to rise. Furthermore, childhood eczema is associated with the development of allergy later in life. As a result, there is considerable interest in identifying effective treatments to prevent eczema and, possibly, halt the progression of allergic disease.

Nutrient Profile: Iodine

by Alan Christianson, ND
04-01-2011 
Iodine is an essential element to human health. Globally, a large percentage of the world's population is affected by iodine deficiency disorders. Iodine-rich diets and iodinization of salt around the world has reduced the prevalence of endemic goiters. In the United States, as well as around the world, the most vulnerable populations to the consequences of iodine deficiency are pregnant women and children. Maintaining adequate iodine status while avoiding acute exposure to large doses of iodine may be the most effective means of lessening iodine-related diseases.

Lycopene's Effects on Health and Diseases

by V. Kalai Selvan, MPharm, PhD
03-01-2011 
Lycopene is present in many fruits and vegetables, with tomatoes and processed tomato products being among the richest sources. This review highlights the scientific documentation of lycopene as a therapeutic agent. Lycopene may alleviate chronic diseases such as cancer and coronary heart disease. Lycopene has also been found effective in the treatment of eye diseases, male infertility, inflammation, and osteoporosis. Experimental, clinical, and epidemiological studies have also established its role in the management of diabetes and hepatoprotection.

The Multifaceted Role of Mast Cells in Cancer

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
02-01-2011 
Mast cells play a dual role in cancer, and their presence in tumor tissue may affect prognosis both positively and negatively. What isn't clear is in which situations mast cells aid tumor growth and in which they suppress it. Published studies are reviewed in an attempt to provide a clinically useful understanding for the practitioner.

The Health Dividend of Glutathione

by Dean P. Jones, PhD
02-01-2011 
Emerging personalized health strategies utilize glutathione (GSH) as a quantitative indicator of health with the expectation that diet selection, GSH supplementation, and lifestyle approaches can be used to manage GSH status, thereby providing a health dividend by protecting against disease development.

Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) and Immune Outcomes in Humans: A Review

by Barry W. Ritz, PhD
01-01-2011 
Active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is a fermented mushroom extract that is commercially available and promoted for immune support. This review focuses on safety and efficacy results from human clinical trials that have included subjects with a variety of cancers, as well as healthy populations. Animal data are also briefly discussed in the context of recent human data, with an emphasis on the possible applications of AHCC in promoting resistance to influenza virus infection. Available data suggest that AHCC supplementation clearly affects immune outcomes and immune cell populations--especially natural killer cell activity.

Hypericum for Depression

by Peter Bongiorno, ND, LAc
12-01-2010 
St. Johns wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a very well studied botanical medicine. Despite the vast body of research, controversy still surrounds its effectiveness, and research for use in pregnancy, breastfeeding women, and children is lacking.This review outlines and summarizes a substantial body of information on hypericum for depressive illness. While studying this research and considering the potential benefits of hypericum for depression, it must be clear that the naturopathic and holistic approach should not focus merely on herbal therapy. Instead, a fully integrative plan should promote a multifactorial, individualized approach that includes diet, lifestyle changes, exercise, spiritual and psychological health, physiologic support using nutrients, and patient-specific modalities that may include homeopathy, acupuncture, massage therapy, or hydrotherapy.

A Commentary on the Nutrient-Chronic Disease Relationship and the New Paradigm of Evidence-Based Nutrition

by Andrew Shao, PhD
12-01-2010 
There is general agreement within the nutrition science and practitioner communities that ones diet, nutritional status, and lifestyle can substantially predispose one to (or protect against) many chronic diseases and other conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. For decades, the US government has invested, and continues to invest, enormous resources to support programs such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Institute of Medicines (IOM) Dietary Reference Intakes to develop recommendations for diet and nutrient intake levels that will, among other things, reduce chronic disease risk within the population. The nutrient-chronic disease relationship is also addressed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) when it reviews Health Claim and Qualified Health Claim petitions, both of which are viewed as broad public health statements. But many questions unique to nutrition still remain when it comes to evaluating the evidence on which these and other recommendations are based.

Naturopathic Approaches to Preventing and Treating Osteoporosis

by Ellen Kamhi, PhD, RN
11-01-2010 
Healthcare providers can help prevent and treat osteoporosis by supporting the improvement of nutritional status through diet and nutritional supplementation, along with suggestion for an increase in exercise training.

Coenzyme Q10 in Parkinson's Disease: Ready for First Line Use?

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
11-01-2010 
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder marked by resting tremors, rigidity of movement, postural abnormalities, and akinesia. The "trigger"for the onset of PD is not known and is presumed to be multifactorial, involving genetic susceptibility and environmental agents.

Parabens and Breast Cancer

by Marianne Marchese, ND
10-01-2010 
Some research has raised concern that parabens may be associated breast cancer. Parabens have been detected in human breast tissue and have shown estrogenic properties.

Dietary Considerations in Chronic Kidney Disease

by Jenna Henderson, ND
09-01-2010 
A low-protein diet can be beneficial to a patient with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the source of that protein is important as well. Many clinicians assume that a vegan diet is superior for kidney patients, but this may not be the case.

The Therapeutic Effects of Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Peripheral Neuropathy: A Review of the Literature

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
08-01-2010 
Conventional therapies have limited success in preventing or reversing symptoms of neuropathic pain and numbness. In the past decade there has been a surge in publications suggesting acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) may be an effective neuroprotectant and antinociceptive for peripheral neuropathy. This review highlights the uses, doses, and proposed mechanisms of action for the therapeutic effects of ALC in patients with peripheral neuropathy.

Development of the Infant Immune Function and the Effects of Breast Milk

by Catherine Clinton, ND
08-01-2010 
There is a need for more extensive research into the development of the immune system in infants so that we have a more complete understanding of how to target and prevent immune disorders. Our current understanding points to 4 main areas in the ontogeny of the infant's immune system as potential early intervention points for the prevention of immune disorders.

Marinades Reduce Heterocyclic Amines from Primitive Food Preparation Techniques

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
07-01-2010 
It is certainly possible, as these papers suggest, to significantly lower the formation of carcinogens during cooking, even while barbecuing. Incorporating specific ingredients into meat through mixing, marinades, or rubs provides accessible means to inhibit formation of HCAs.