Abstracts & Commmentary

Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer Causes Long-Term Heart Toxicity

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
11-01-2011 
The use of adjuvant radiation therapy in women who have undergone a lumpectomy for breast cancer has become routine practice. The findings from the current study substantiate the body of evidence that has accumulated showing that radiation therapy does have long-term consequences to the heart muscle and vasculature.

Dark Chocolate Reduces Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
11-01-2011 
In a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover designed trial, 20 active men consumed chocolate or a placebo for 2 weeks and then performed a bout of prolonged cycling. Those consuming dark chocolate had lower F2-isoprostanes at exhaustion and during recovery. Consuming dark chocolate lowered levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins both before and after exercise. Chocolate consumption was also associated with ~21% greater increase in free fatty acids during exercise.

Are Breast Thermograms Accurate Enough to Use?

by Katherine Neubauer, ND, FABNO
11-01-2011 
It's time to reconsider the use of breast thermography in breast cancer screening and breast mass assessment. Thermography remains a controversial topic in integrative oncology. Although digital thermography is FDA approved for adjunctive breast imaging to clarify results of mammography or breast MRI, it is often employed for broader applications. In particular, some practitioners and patients use thermography for cancer screening, to evaluate palpated masses, and as an alternative to mammography.

Dietary Supplements and Mortality Rate in Older Women

by Douglas MacKay, ND
11-01-2011 
Observational study assessing the relationship between supplement use and total mortality rate in older women. The study utilized data from the Iowa Women's Health Study, which was originally designed to examine associations between several host, dietary, and lifestyle factors and the incidence of cancer in postmenopausal women.

Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

by Geovanni Espinosa, ND, LAc, CNS
11-01-2011 
Participants without prostate cancer were monitored every 6 months with an annual limited physical examination including blood pressure, weight, and smoking status; participants who developed prostate cancer during the study were monitored annually thereafter.

Low Levels of the Essential Fatty Acid DHA Associated With Greater Military Suicide Risk

by Keri Marshall, ND
10-01-2011 
This study clearly demonstrates the impact of nutritional deficiency and the role it may play in mental health status.

Night Shift Work Decreases Risk of Melanoma

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
10-01-2011 
It is possible that higher melatonin levels may be beneficial in people with stable circadian rhythms, but in night workers with unstable rhythms, simple suppression of melatonin may be more beneficial.

Glucosamine May Lower Lung Cancer Risk

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
10-01-2011 
Glucosamine is commonly used for joint support, and it has attracted very little interest for any other use outside of osteoarthritic pain. This large epidemiological study gives us reason to look at other unexpected benefits to this simple molecule. The risk of lung adenocarcinoma was cut approximately in half in those taking glucosamine at least 4 times per week for 3 years.

Broccoli: Alternatives to Eating It Raw

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
10-01-2011 
Cruciferous plants use sulforaphane to ward off bacterial, viral, and fungal infection. Given the quantity of research that suggests the phytochemical sulforaphane plays a desirable role in promoting health, we should encourage our patients to consume foods or supplements that will provide this chemical. This study adds valuable information on how to do so.

Antidepressants and Dementia: More Risk than Benefit?

by Christie Fleetwood, ND, RPh
09-01-2011 
It's time to reconsider the use of antidepressants in Alzheimer's sufferers. Instead, we should focus on true prevention: eating real foods, drinking clean water, exercising daily exercise in a way we enjoy, engaging in healthy relationships, keeping minds active, and maintaining supportive social structures.

Berberine Calms GI Upset From Radiation Therapy

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
09-01-2011 
The results of several cohorts were reported in this paper. Thirty-six patients with seminoma or lymphomas were treated; half received the trial medication, the remainder placebo. Forty-two patients with cervical cancer were also treated, again half with medication and half with placebo. Taking berberine significantly decreased the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute intestinal syndrome in these patients compared to the patients in the control group.

Colic Improves With Acupuncture

by Jaclyn Chasse-Smeaton, ND
09-01-2011 
Ninety otherwise healthy infants aged 2 to 8 weeks with infantile colic were randomized to receive acupuncture or no treatment. No sham acupuncture was administered.

Long-Term Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention on Weight and Cardiovascular Risk

by Christine Toomasi, ND
09-01-2011 
Patients can feel overwhelmed when diagnosed with diabetes, often due to the expectation of lifestyle change with minimal clinical support. Exercise and healthy, balanced meals are interventions commonly used by integrative practitioners for diabetic patients. While this trial does a great job of highlighting the importance of these interventions, more significantly it emphasizes the importance of consistent education, support, and behavioral strategies. Although the endpoint of cardiovascular events cannot be determined without further follow-up, it would seem reasonable that the changes noted thus far in the intervention group will result in decreased cardiovascular events based on the reduction of CVD risk factors.

Multiple Pesticide Exposures Increases Lymphoma Risk

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
08-01-2011 
A case-control study using multiple logistic regression analysis to assess the relationship between the number of pesticides used and ensuing risk of developing NHL. Exposure data was gotten from the Cross-Canada Study of Pesticides and Health, gathered between 1991 and 1994. Ensuing cases of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were found through hospital records or cancer registries.

Dietary Intervention in Infancy and Later Signs of Beta-Cell Autoimmunity

by Christine Toomasi, ND
08-01-2011 
With the incidence of type 1 diabetes rising faster than it has previously among children, food content in early childhood has been postulated to impact the risk of developing this disease later in life. In particular, early exposure to complex protein (found in cow's milk-based formula) and shortened breastfeeding duration could be risk factors for beta cell autoimmunity. In this trial, researchers from the Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) project investigated the effect of early dietary intervention during infancy on genetically susceptible infants.

Magnesium Supplementation Reduces Hot Flashes in Women with Breast Cancer

by Michael T. Murray, ND
08-01-2011 
Magnesium supplementation was found to be associated with a significant reduction in frequency/week of hot flashes and hot flash score. Reductions in fatigue, sweating, and distress were all significant.

Time for a Siesta?

by Teresa Silliman, ND
08-01-2011 
Napping in the mid-day is a custom in many cultures throughout the world. Whether such naps affect nighttime sleeping patterns by lessening the duration or quality of nighttime sleep has been debated. This study suggests that nighttime sleep duration and quality are not impaired by regular napping.

Restless Leg Syndrome and Melatonin

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
08-01-2011 
This small study may in time be seen as one of the first clinical trials that eventually lead to a change in the way we approach restless leg syndrome (RLS) treatment in clinical practice.

Antioxidant Use During Treatment for Breast Cancer

by Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO
07-01-2011 
The theoretical risk of interference with antioxidant compounds during treatment for cancer has been given as the reason to avoid all supplementation while receiving conventional therapies. This study shows the use of the antioxidants vitamin C and vitamin E during and after treatment with chemotherapy has a statistically significant impact on both mortality and risk of recurrence.

The Potato Chip Study

by Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO
07-01-2011 
Weight gain or loss is complex. Increasing consumption of healthy foods and avoidance of bad foods, especially potatoes, leads to weight loss. This concept is not new to any of us. Simple carbohydrates increase weight gain.